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Thread: This Date In History ...

  1. #11
    Senior Member Swamp Fox's Avatar
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    April 21:

    1918
    German fighter ace Baron von Richthofen, "The Red Baron," is shot down and killed.


    https://www.historynet.com/red-baron...richthofen.htm





    The funeral of Manfred von Richthofen. April 22, 1918, No.3 Squadron lays to rest an old adversary, at Bertangles Cemetery, France.


    Manfred von Richthofen was laid to rest late in the afternoon of April 22 in a small, unkempt cemetery in Bertangles. He was buried with full military honors after a short service by an Anglican chaplain. Twelve men from No. 3 Squadron, Australian Flying Corps, each fired three rounds into the air. Other officers placed wreaths on the grave. The body was set with feet facing the marker, a four-bladed propeller trimmed to form a cross. Upset about a German being buried in their cemetery, the villagers descended on the grave that night, uprooted the marker and tried to dig up the body.

    That same evening, RAF pilots dropped canisters containing news of Richthofen’s death and pictures of his funeral over Jagdgeschwader I, confirming the fears of the German officers there. Oberleutnant Wilhelm Reinhard succeeded Richthofen as commander of JG.I, as per Richthofen’s wishes, but he only lasted two months; Oberleutnant Hermann Wilhelm Goring assumed command after Reinhard’s death.

    Richthofen’s body was moved after the war to a larger cemetery at Fricourt. His brother Karl Bolko had his body moved again in 1925, this time to Berlin, where, in a large state funeral with thousands in the procession, he was buried at Fnvaliden Cemetery. A modest flat memorial stone was unveiled the following year by his mother. Goring added a monument in 1938. All the Red Baron’s war trophies, an impressive collection kept at his home, were lost when the Russians advanced through Schweidnitz near the end of World War II.

  2. #12
    Senior Member Swamp Fox's Avatar
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    April 22 ----- A lot goin' on:


    1509
    Henry VIII ascends to the throne of England upon the death of his father, Henry VII.

    1529
    Spain and Portugal divide the eastern hemisphere in the Treaty of Saragossa.


    1861
    Robert E. Lee is named commander of Virginia forces.

    1889
    The Oklahoma land rush officially starts at noon as thousands of Americans race for new, unclaimed land.

    1898
    In the first action of the Spanish-American War, the USS Nashville, takes on a Spanish ship.


    1915
    At the Second Battle of Ypres, the Germans use poison gas for the first time.

    1918
    British naval forces attempt to sink block-ships in the German U-boat bases at the Battle of Zeebrugge.


    1944
    Allies launch major attack against the Japanese in Hollandia, New Guinea.

    1954
    The Senate Army-McCarthy hearings begin. They are broadcast on television.


    1955
    Congress orders all U.S. coins to bear the motto "In God We Trust."

    1976
    Barbara Walters becomes the first female nightly news anchor on network television.

    1995
    In Africa, Rwandan troops kill thousands of Hutu refugees in Kibeho.



    ++++++




    After all that, today was relatively quiet, but I'm not gonna comment further ... LOL:


    April 26

    1865
    Joseph E. Johnston surrenders the Army of Tennessee to General William T. Sherman.

    1931
    New York Yankee Lou Gehrig hits a home run but is called out for passing a runner, the mistake ultimately costs him the home run record.

  3. #13
    Senior Member Swamp Fox's Avatar
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    May 10 ...




    .

    Don't make me school y'all in the origin of Memorial Day ...

  4. #14
    Senior Member Swamp Fox's Avatar
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    =May 11, 1864
    Confederate General J.E.B. Stuart is mortally wounded at Yellow Tavern.




    J.E.B. Stuart: Battle of Gettysburg Scapegoat




    The guns had scarcely fallen silent at Gettysburg before the questions and recriminations began. Disappointed Southerners refused to believe that the infallible Robert E. Lee could lose a battle, particularly one as vital as Gettysburg. Someone else must be to blame. Even after Lee himself had said (with much reason), ‘It is all my fault, supporters inside and outside the Army began looking about for a convenient scapegoat. They quickly found one in the outsized personality of Major General J.E.B. Stuart, Lee’s flamboyant cavalry chief.

    [...]


    With Lee’s and Longstreet’s rather vague advice in hand, Stuart turned to his most trusted scout, John Singleton Mosby, for information on the best route to take into Pennsylvania. Mosby, who would later find fame as the commanding colonel of an effective independent cavalry unit in northern Virginia, Mosby’s Rangers, was still serving on Stuart’s personal staff. He rode into headquarters on June 23 with word that Stuart could pass safely around the rear of Hooker’s widely dispersed army in western Maryland en route to Pennsylvania. Hooker, said Mosby, was lying idle along a 25-mile-long line from Leesburg, Va., to Thoroughfare Gap, just west of Haymarket, and the Federal line was stretched so thin that Stuart could simply ride through it. It was a dangerously overoptimistic assessment of the military situation, based on the assumption that the Federals would simply sit still and wait for events to overtake them. But Stuart trusted Mosby implicitly and was, at any rate, always ready to accept information that conformed to his own expectations.

    [...]


    Criticism of Stuart, which began as a murmur among Lee’s personal staff, soon exploded onto the front pages of prominent Southern newspapers, which were read by both private citizens and high-ranking members of the Confederate government. At issue was Stuart’s supposed failure to provide Lee with crucial information about the enemy’s troop movements in the days leading up to Gettysburg. This lack of accurate intelligence, it was said, had caused Lee to blunder into a battle he did not seek, on ground he did not choose. It was all Stuart’s fault, for going off on an ill-advised raid around the Union army when Lee needed him close at hand. Contrary to popular belief, however, Stuart had followed Lee’s orders strictly, if not perhaps totally, and he was innocent of the harshest accusations made against him. In no way did Stuart’s raid deprive Lee of the cavalry needed to monitor his opponent’s movements, only of the officers skilled enough to do so successfully.Stuart, based on the directions given him, did everything that could have been expected of him. Typically, raids on enemy communications are only a nuisance and rarely cause any real damage. Still, in carrying out the raid, Stuart followed his orders to the letter. Given no real timetable, he moved quickly, doing what damage he could, and brought in much-needed provisions for the army. Expecting to meet Ewell’s corps at the Susquehanna River, Stuart chose the best available route. All the same, he lost valuable time by lugging with him the captured wagon train and prisoners, which gave the Union cavalry time to intercept him at Hanover, Pa., causing Stuart to lose an extra day.

    In the end, there was blame enough for all. Lee and Longstreet should have given better instructions. Stuart should have left behind better officers than Jones and Robertson, who, in turn, should have better carried out their clearly stated orders. Mosby should have given Stuart better scouting information. Ewell should have made more of an effort to find Stuart and come to his aid at Hanover. All could have joined Lee in groaning, after Gettysburg, Too bad! Too bad! Oh, too bad!

    https://www.historynet.com/jeb-stuart



    https://www.historynet.com/battle-of-yellow-tavern.htm

  5. #15
    Senior Member Swamp Fox's Avatar
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    "There goes the neighborhood ..."


    May 12:


    1780
    Charleston, South Carolina falls to British forces.


    1863
    With a victory at the Battle of Raymond, Mississippi, Union General Ulysses S. Grant closes in on Vicksburg.

    1864
    Union General Benjamin Butler attacks Drewry's Bluff on the James River.

    1865
    The last land battle of the Civil war occurs at Palmito Ranch, Texas. It is a Confederate victory.


    May 13:

    1607
    English colonists land near the James River in Virginia.


    1779
    The War of Bavarian Succession ends.

    1846
    The United States declares war on Mexico after fighting has already begun.

    1861
    Britain declares its neutrality in the American Civil War.


    1864
    The Battle of Resaca commences as Union General William T. Sherman fights towards Atlanta.

    1888
    Slavery is abolished in Brazil.

    1912
    The Royal Flying Corps is established in England.


    1944
    Allied forces in Italy break through the German Gustav Line into the Liri Valley.


    1958
    French troops take control of Algiers.

    1968
    Peace talks between the United States and North Vietnam begin in Paris.



  6. #16
    Senior Member Swamp Fox's Avatar
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    0017
    Germanicus of Rome celebrates his victory over the Germans.

    1647
    A new law bans Catholic priests from the colony of Massachusetts. The penalty is banishment or death for a second offense.

    1691
    Jacob Leisler, leader of the popular uprising in support of William and Mary's succession to the throne, is executed for treason.

    1865
    The last Confederate army surrenders in Shreveport, Louisiana.

    1938
    The House Committee on Un-American Activities begins its work of searching for subversives in the United States.

    1940
    The evacuation of Allied forces from Dunkirk begins.

    1946
    A patent is filed in the United States for the H-bomb.

    1969
    Apollo 10 returns to Earth.

    1977
    The movie Star Wars debuts.

    2019
    Bart Starr, Minnesota Vikings/Dallas Cowboys legend, passes away after a long illness.


  7. #17
    Senior Member DParker's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Swamp Fox View Post
    1938
    The House Committee on Un-American Activities begins its work of searching for subversives in the United States.
    I'm thinking it's time to dust that one off and take it for a spin again.
    Don't go ninja-in' nobody don't need ninja-in'.
    - Diemon Dave

  8. #18
    Senior Member Swamp Fox's Avatar
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    It couldn't hurt ...


    http://nymag.com/intelligencer/2019/...t-problem.html





    And how 'bout that Bart Starr guy?



  9. #19
    Senior Member Swamp Fox's Avatar
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    Okay, I give up ...


    But how 'bout today? :


    (6/21)

    1667
    The Peace of Breda ends the Second Anglo-Dutch War as the Dutch cede New Amsterdam to the English.


    1791
    The French royal family is arrested in Varennes.


    1862
    Union and Confederate forces skirmish at the Chickahominy Creek.


    1863
    In the second day of fighting, Confederate troops fail to dislodge a Union force at the Battle of LaFourche Crossing.

    1887
    Britain celebrates the golden jubilee of Queen Victoria.

    1900
    General Douglas MacArthur offers amnesty to Filipinos rebelling against American rule.

    1908
    Mulai Hafid again proclaims himself the true sultan of Morocco.

    1911
    Porforio Diaz, the ex-president of Mexico, exiles himself to Paris.


    1915
    Germany uses poison gas for the first time in warfare in the Argonne Forest.

    1919
    Germans scuttle their own fleet at Scapa Flow, Scotland.

    1939
    Baseball legend Lou Gehrig is forced to quit baseball because of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis--a disease which wastes muscles.

    1942
    German General Erwin Rommel captures the port city of Tobruk in North Africa.

    1945
    Japanese forces on Okinawa surrender to American troops.


    1948
    Dr. Peter Goldmark demonstrates his "long-playing" record.

    1958
    A federal judge allows Little Rock, Arkansas to delay school integration.

    1963
    France announces it will withdraw from the NATO fleet in the North Atlantic.

    1964
    Three civil rights workers disappear in Meridian, Mississippi.

    1982
    John Hinckley Jr. is found not guilty by reason of insanity for attempting to assassinate President Ronald Reagan.


    1995
    The U.S. Senate votes against the nomination of Dr. Henry W. Foster for Surgeon General.



    It all makes sense when you put it in perspective ...

  10. #20
    Senior Member DParker's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Swamp Fox View Post
    1942
    German General Erwin Rommel captures the port city of Tobruk in North Africa.
    Magnificent bastard. Have you read his book?
    Don't go ninja-in' nobody don't need ninja-in'.
    - Diemon Dave

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