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Thread: MERRY CHRISTMAS TO ALL MY FRIENDS ON H.C.

  1. #21
    Senior Member DParker's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bluecat View Post
    Maybe a day. You can experiment with that and let me know. I never even thought of that before.
    I wonder if that's why you've found > 2 hours of smoke to be too much. Everything I've read suggests that you really need to wrap the cheese and let it mellow in the fridge for a few days before eating.

    But then again, maybe > 2 hours really is too much, and the mellowing period is just compensating for that.

    The more experience I get with smoking (and other cooking methods) the more I learn that many generally accepted, tried-and-true bits of culinary "wisdom" are actually complete nonsense.
    Don't go ninja-in' nobody don't need ninja-in'.
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  2. #22
    Senior Member DParker's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Triton Rich View Post
    I hope everyone had a Merry Christmas! That's a fine looking knife DP. Does it actually have a bunch of dimples in it or is that an illusion? My first thought was that the dimples would prevent the slices of whatever from sticking to the blade.
    Quote Originally Posted by DParker View Post
    Yep, it's a hammered blade.



    That's the theory behind it. I have yet to try it, so I don't know if it really works in practice.
    Since my experience so far is limited to the aforementioned onion-cutting exercise my interim assessment here is subject to change as I get to try it out with more food items:

    While the onion slices did stick to the blade in spite of the hammered dimples, it did seem that it slid through the onions with significantly less resistance than I'm used to experiencing. Now, whether that was due to the dimples reducing surface area contact with the onions, the sharpness of the edge, the altered cutting technique I was using...or combination of those 3...I can't say yet. But it seems logical that reducing the amount of blade surface that comes in contact with the item being cut would result in less friction and/or "stickiness".
    Don't go ninja-in' nobody don't need ninja-in'.
    - Diemon Dave

  3. #23
    Senior Member bluecat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DParker View Post
    I wonder if that's why you've found > 2 hours of smoke to be too much. Everything I've read suggests that you really need to wrap the cheese and let it mellow in the fridge for a few days before eating.

    But then again, maybe > 2 hours really is too much, and the mellowing period is just compensating for that.

    The more experience I get with smoking (and other cooking methods) the more I learn that many generally accepted, tried-and-true bits of culinary "wisdom" are actually complete nonsense.
    That makes sense to me. I know over 2 hours and it is harsh. So you may be on to something there. I've always wrapped them up and eaten them a few days later (aside from testing of course) and it's been great.
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  4. #24
    Senior Member Swamp Fox's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DParker View Post
    I wonder if that's why you've found > 2 hours of smoke to be too much. Everything I've read suggests that you really need to wrap the cheese and let it mellow in the fridge for a few days before eating.

    But then again, maybe > 2 hours really is too much, and the mellowing period is just compensating for that.

    The more experience I get with smoking (and other cooking methods) the more I learn that many generally accepted, tried-and-true bits of culinary "wisdom" are actually complete nonsense.
    Quote Originally Posted by bluecat View Post
    That makes sense to me. I know over 2 hours and it is harsh. So you may be on to something there. I've always wrapped them up and eaten them a few days later (aside from testing of course) and it's been great.




    If ArcheryWorld/BowCountry/HuntingCountry legends were writing comedy sketches that hadn't been done in 1972:



    C: Oh, I like it harsh.

    O: Well,.. It's very harsh, actually, sir.

    C: No matter. Fetch hither the fromage de la Smokey Joe! Mmmwah!

    O: I...think it's a bit smokier than you'll like it, sir.

    C: I don't care how ****ing smokey it is. Hand it over with all speed.

    O: Oooooooooohhh........! (pause)

    C: What now?

    O: The cat's eaten it.

    C: (pause) Has he?

    O: She, sir.

  5. #25
    Senior Member DParker's Avatar
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    +8.382

    I guess that when I said my smoker could use a cleaning I should have noted that it's certainly uncontaminated by cheese.
    Don't go ninja-in' nobody don't need ninja-in'.
    - Diemon Dave

  6. #26
    Senior Member Swamp Fox's Avatar
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    +5

    You can make up for this by asking Alexa to play some bouzouki music next time you use it...

  7. #27
    seems like christmas isnt like they used to be... plus i've been a colts fan for years.How bout those cowboys billy????

  8. #28
    Senior Member Swamp Fox's Avatar
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    I don't want to hear about Christmas from you.

    We all know your tree has been out on the curb since the 26th ...

  9. #29
    Senior Member DParker's Avatar
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    I've used my new Shun knife several times over the past week or so and am finally getting the hang of the cutting technique that the kiritsuke profile was designed for, and all I can say is that I really, really like this blade. It's gone through everything I've used it on like a light saber through butter (OK, maybe I'm exaggerating a bit....or am I?). Last night I brought home an 11 lb pork belly and wanted to cut off a few 1.5 lb portions for making chashu (gesundheit!), saving the rest of it for the next time I make bacon. I used the Shun to do so by cutting right through the heavy-duty vac-pac the bellies come in, and then just peeling the plastic off the individual cuts. It was ridiculously easy. It's like using an 8" scalpel.

    Of course, the thin, hard steel requires some careful handling in order to avoid chipping it. But the way it glides through whatever I'm cutting means that I don't need to use much pressure at all, so it doesn't hit the cutting board with enough force to do any damage, or roll the edge. I haven't even needed to use a steel on it yet, and it still feels just as sharp as when I took it out of the box. I think that so long as I don't try to use it like a cleaver (or drop it, or otherwise abuse it) it'll hold up just fine.
    Don't go ninja-in' nobody don't need ninja-in'.
    - Diemon Dave

  10. #30
    Senior Member bluecat's Avatar
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    So how does the cutting technique differ than a normal Chef knife. You don't rock it back and forth?

    Do you make the flaming tower of onions and catch an egg in your Chef's hat? How does it hold up to all the fidgeting and banging that goes on when you are cooking.
    Zombie Response Team

    I write English not so well, but this thin string for sewing or fabric-making my funny wheel getickles. Baron von Schtupp

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