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Thread: Cam Repair and Serving Wear

  1. #1
    Senior Member Swamp Fox's Avatar
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    Cam Repair and Serving Wear

    I'm too lazy to look it up, and besides, it's too quiet around here, so here's a question or two:

    Besides some flaw in a cam, what are other causes of serving wear?


    Second: I have an idler wheel and a cam with some flaws on the outer rims, but don't feel much--if anything-- when I run a fingernail inside. I'm thinking about taking a fine file and touching up a few spots just to be sure. Good idea?

  2. #2
    1- Wrist torque can cause significant serving wear specifically around the cam or cams

    2- I wouldn't mess with it if it's so insignificant you can't even feel it. Why risk messing up the balance.

  3. #3
    Senior Member Swamp Fox's Avatar
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    Okay, I didn't think of wrist torque but I think I've heard that before. I have seen people torque a string right off the bow a time or two, LOL.

    I doubt I'd remove any metal to speak of. Just clean up a bump or two. I can't feel any sharp burrs on the inside but the outsides have a few nicks.


    My first thought was that the serving used was too big.

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by Swamp Fox View Post
    Okay, I didn't think of wrist torque but I think I've heard that before. I have seen people torque a string right of the bow a time or two, LOL.

    I doubt I'd remove any metal to speak of. Just clean up a bump or two. I can't feel any sharp burrs on the inside but the outsides have a few nicks.


    My first thought was that the serving used was too big.


    If the string/cable are not original this is highly likely. Not all string builders are equal. If you decide you need a new set I highly recommend Pure Perfextion out of Ohio. These guys are the best in the biz. http://www.brokenrackarchery.com/pureperfextion.php

  5. #5
    Senior Member Swamp Fox's Avatar
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    Thanks for that. This bow has a long history of tuning problems which I've taken care of the best I can. I keep it around for grins and giggles and for low draw-weight PT.

    I don't remember if I chewed up the last string that was on it. I'm a little surprised but not shocked that this string wasn't made with appropriate serving, but I'm not ruling out a bow problem, either.

  6. #6
    Senior Member Jon's Avatar
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    Swampy, a bunch of possibilities come to mind, torque is certainly one of them.
    If you're getting serving wear, there is a chance the serving is too thick.
    There is a chance the bearing in the cam is bad
    There is a chance the cables aren't tuned properly causing cam lean and thus, serving wear.
    Yes, you can take a fine file or sand paper/emory cloth and clean up the cam. I've done it a hundred times with no ill effect. Obviously, I'm talking about very minor sanding. There shouldn't be any burs or sharp edges.
    If this bow is being that difficult and you've done the obvious stuff (string/cables, bow setup, good grip etc), have you ensured that the arrows are proper for the bow?
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  7. #7
    Senior Member Swamp Fox's Avatar
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    Yes, I've always paid attention to arrow selection. This is the same bow from my limb swap thread. Once the limbs were exchanged and I put a dropaway on it, the bow shot acceptably, though it's so long since I did a papertune with it I should probably leave it at that. If I get this bow restrung and up and running again (I'm debating whether I really want to get into it right now) my preferred arrow for it is a 26-inch Beman Hunter 500 with a 100 grain point. I think I had this bow set to 54 pounds.


    Is there an easy way to tell if a bearing is bad? The cam does wobble/cause the limb to shimmy if you spin it with your finger.

    Edit: The issue isn't the cam wobbling as much as it is the limb shimmies. It also doesn't spin nearly as smoothly as the idler wheel.

  8. #8
    Senior Member Jon's Avatar
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    you can check the bearings like you'd check any bearing, spin it. They are sealed bearings and should be silent. You can grab the cam, there should be no top to bottom movement, the bearing is a high tolerance fit and should allow zero play. Also, check the axle by taking it off and rolling it on a flat surface, it should roll freely proving it's straightness.
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  9. #9
    Senior Member Swamp Fox's Avatar
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    Thanks. There is some friction noise (slight) when you spin the cam but I can't say it's from the bearing. I suspect it's from the c-clips. I'll have everything looked at when this thing goes in the shop.

    I located a cam last night in case I need to replace mine, but I'm coming up snake eyes on an idler wheel.


    BTW, my understanding is that Mathews now uses an upgraded bearings and spacer system, so that's a possible fix/improvement as well.

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