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  • Bob Peck's Avatar
    5 Hours Ago
    Of course we can. That's what we have.
    24 replies | 178 view(s)
  • Bob Peck's Avatar
    1 Day Ago
    You sure won't leave empty handed. This tour is 30 mins from my home takes a good half day to full day if the weather is cooperating and ends up with an Uber ride home nobody remembers. http://nelson151.com/
    24 replies | 178 view(s)
  • Bob Peck's Avatar
    1 Day Ago
    hi·jack /ˈhīˌjak/ verb 1. illegal seizure of a legitimate online forum thread forcing it to go to a different destination or use it for one's own purposes. "he hijacked the thread with stupid jokes, images, nonsensical verbiage and back slapping buddy banter having nothing at all to do with the original post thus robbing others of discourse and commentary." The man said he couldn't hunt because of the weather which forced him into the netherworld of homemade noodles. That's some serious stuff right there.
    24 replies | 178 view(s)
  • Bob Peck's Avatar
    1 Day Ago
    Aye laddie, the very crux of the matter. I truly understand. I was shocked to learn this some years back. But then again, when someone in Texas says "ranch" they don't mean a few hundred acres like where I come from. I've extended an invite already which includes you and your son. Bring it. I'll show you around some mighty fine Blue Ridge hunting on public and private land.
    24 replies | 178 view(s)
  • Bob Peck's Avatar
    1 Day Ago
    Sounds like you need some Gore Tex and some Muck boots DP. Just reallocate some of the brown liquor budget. You don't hunt in the rain or you don't bow hunt in the rain? I am unconcerned what the weather is doing during gun season unless there is an ice storm which is where I draw the line. All it takes is one tree or limb falling on your head to ruin a hunt. I speak from experience. :wink Bow season? Whole 'nother story. If moderate-to-heavy rain is expected I might try to beat the weather timing wise but if it's gonna be an all out deluge for hours on end? Forgedda bout it. This hunt here (link below) at the Montezuma National Wildlife Refuge back in my old stomping grounds in Upstate NY was absolutely *ALL* in water or swampy land. Hunters line up for the 175 permits available each hunt day on a first-come, first-served basis. In other words, it's some of the best public/federal land hunting I've ever experienced. https://www.fws.gov/uploadedFiles/Region_5/NWRS/Central_Zone/Montezuma/Sections/PDFs/2018DEERHUNTREGULATIONS.pdf How does your state stack up with the availability of hunting land dedicated to public access? http://www.backcountrychronicles.com/public-hunting-land/
    24 replies | 178 view(s)
  • Bob Peck's Avatar
    2 Days Ago
    DP, Am I reading this right? You don't hunt in the rain or you don't bow hunt in the rain?
    24 replies | 178 view(s)
  • Bob Peck's Avatar
    6 Days Ago
    25 processors in SC participating in with SC Hunters for the Hungry based in Spartansburg, SC (aka South Carolina Hunters and Landowners for the Hungry (HLFH) http://www.schuntersforthehungry.com/processors/ Distribution is mostly through churches which is pretty typical but I can't tell if it's just Upstate or the whole state Last year, 26,000 pounds of wild game meat was distributed to families. The group has set a goal of 35,000 pounds this year. Hunters for the Hungry covers the processing fee. Much of the group’s funding to pay for meat processing comes from the United Way of the Piedmont. Hunters who donate meat can help by donating part of the processing fee, which can average around $65 per deer. There are also two (2) SC Chapters of FHFH (Farmers and Hunters Feeding the Hungry) covering Calhoun, Richland and Charleston counties. FHFH typically fills in gaps where other programs are not represented in an effort to covers as many locales as possible. There aren't any FHFH chapters in VA or NY as the venison donation programs already in place cover all counties in each state and both have general funds available for operations. So, SC has some semblance of a venison donation program with no mention anywhere of whether or not the hide needs to be on or off. I will say that beyond market rate payment to the processors in most states, processors also reap the incremental revenue from hides that come from skinning, salted and shipped to tanners who buy them by the pallet & tractor trailer load.
    19 replies | 240 view(s)
  • Bob Peck's Avatar
    6 Days Ago
    Although there are many variations the only model I've seen work goes like this: 1. The processor has to conform to and be licensed by the state to process meat often periodically being inspected by health authorities and game wardens. In other words, the processor must meet the same USDA standards as the larger slaughter houses and meat distributors. This one point eliminates many seasonal processors working out of their garages. I've interviewed and set up many a processor. While not an inspector it doesn't take much for me to say to myself "Nope. I wouldn't bring my deer here!" Some processors do not want to participate in venison programs if they already have successful businesses processing beef, pork, poultry, etc. They reason, perhaps justly, for the number of deer they might potentially process that breaking down the equipment and sanitizing in between the various species isn't worth the effort. On the other hand if the processor is in an area of great demand for processing venison it is often financially worthwhile to temporarily suspend processing other species whether or not they are interested in participating in a donation program. The excellent processors understand there is more to the program than a steady stream of referrals and actually provide discounted rates. 2. For this processing collaboration to work, the processor must get paid the going market rate. If the hunter and/or the processor has to pay even a dime the success is immediately in doubt and most programs like that fail. In NY and Virginia, it took years but we negotiated a "general fund" legislative allocation to keep the programs up and running as well as voluntary "check box" contributions from hunters purchasing hunting licenses, money coming from corporate donors/sponsors and believe it or not the food banks themselves. The food banks would rather not pay for the venison directly (i.e. per pound at a discounted rate). It works better and looks better for them to participate in "sponsorship" with the silent assumption that their sponsorship somehow comes with preferred access to the distribution chain. After-all, the food banks have customers too. There is never enough free or discounted meat in circulation. In almost all the programs I've worked or consulted with (TX, MI, NY, VA) when the money runs out, the processing stops and everything grinds to a halt.
    19 replies | 240 view(s)
  • Bob Peck's Avatar
    6 Days Ago
    Me either. Nothing "formal" about dropping a deer off at a processor instead of my garage. Easy peasy. Besides, the same guy who might process my deer for my personal consumption is conveniently the same guy who is going to process the deer into ground venison, shape it into 1/4 pound packs, freeze it and get paid his/her going rate. The difference is the Blue Ridge Food Bank shows up with their refrigerator truck and distributes to Catholic Charities, Salvation Army and several other church sponsored/community sponsored food banks around the state. Last year, 355,000 lbs of venison were distributed in Virginia. I've helped set and/or fund raised for three different states, NY, MI and VA. During the recession word got around in my church that I put in the time and donated venison through Virginia's Hunters for the Hungry. More than one grown man with tears in his eyes confidentially and with some shame written on his face asked politely if I could spare any meat until they got back on their feet and found a job. This direct donation was highly personal and satisfying. It gave new meaning to helping out a brother or sister. I continue to see many of these men in my community and there is an unspoken bond none of us will forget. As do I but I couldn't single-handedly eat 4 deer in a year if I tried. I don't look at it as giving anything away because that would devalue the effort expended by the hunter and commoditize the animal that is the by-product of the hunt. Sanitized, a natural resource becomes part of the supply chain and helps to manage deer populations." Simple and something non-hunters and hunters can wrap their heads around. The turning point for me was serving many a meal to children, single Mom's abandoned by their husbands and unemployed people caught in a financial death spiral. The stereotype homeless person these days is definitely not the psycho drunk, drug addict, mentally challenged person although obviously they exist. Staring into the eyes of a hungry kid so totally dependent on a ladle of venison chili does something to you. I enjoy processing too but after the 2nd or 3rd deer it becomes drudgery and legit work. With a standard VA hunting license the bag limit is 2 bucks, 3 does + over-the-counter additional doe permits. If you add in organized legal management programs I participate in, DMAP tags (deer management assistance program), DCAP tags (damage control assistance program) and DPOP tags (deer population reduction program) the number of deer that could be taken here is crazy. Granted, not every hunter can receive the DMAP, DCAP and DPOP tags but if you're into hunting and want to expand your options it's all available. My worst year in the last twelve years was 4, my best year was 12. I enjoy processing too but after the 2nd or 3rd deer it becomes drudgery for me. Again, we have different perspectives. I'm not giving anything away because I don't have the time to process. I am playing the role of predator so those humans in my local tribe who are hungry can eat. Donate. Pay it forward.
    19 replies | 240 view(s)
  • Bob Peck's Avatar
    6 Days Ago
    You're always welcome in my home Jon! We're wrapped up for deer (muzzleloader or bow) by Jan 5. Turkey opens April 13th - May 18th. Bring it!
    24 replies | 556 view(s)
  • Bob Peck's Avatar
    1 Week Ago
    C'mon now. You're not going to let a little brown liquor get in the way are you? You're a Texan where everything is bigger, even hangovers. Please do ponder. I ain't kiddin. (well sort of, by the time you get here I'll have my dang deer car) Come to think of it I could use my new deer cart to haul you to your stand. Eh? Eh?
    35 replies | 356 view(s)
  • Bob Peck's Avatar
    1 Week Ago
    Tell you what, you come to Virginia and bring your deer cart and your favorite brown liquor. I'll guide you to the deer, feed you, house you and keep the cart when you leave. I might even ship the venison back to you that you collect while here! Deal? :laugh:
    35 replies | 356 view(s)
  • Bob Peck's Avatar
    1 Week Ago
    P.S Epilogue to the story. Same stand exactly 1 week apart from the last time I sat in it to shoot the 1st buck. Again following instructions I hunted a morning sit and saw nothing. Packed up around 10:00 a.m. and made my way to the top of the ravine. My mind, no longer focused on hunting was startled awake. A big patch of grey at the top moved at 50 yards away. This buck never saw me and for the first time in many, many years I stalked quietly within 25 yards. He's making a scrape. He's gnashing up the over-hanging branch. He's browsing. He's scratching himself. He's putting on and then decides to slowly walk straight at me. Now he's 15 yards directly in front of me. The wind is perfect and gently blowing in my face. The gun is already up and resting against a tree nestled in the "Y" of my thumb and index finger. "Perfect." I say to myself. "I'll drop him right here on top with an easy drag to the logging road a mere 25 yards away." POW! Goes the 30-06 aiming right at the base of his neck. He shudders like he took a huge gulp of Jack Daniels, staggers a bit and bolts directly off the top of the mountain ridge. I'm positive he had to have dropped right off the top crest of the ravine but noooooo ... He bounds all the way to the bottom of the ravine, crashing, bashing, auguring into the forest floor here and there and finally piles up and lands less than 50 yards from where the first buck in this story dropped. This buck was nothing to speak of per se but helped me get one animal closer to my venison donation goal. Thankfully he did not dress out as heavy as the first so this time I decided the drag straight up was doable vs the long route I took with the first deer. LOL! I'm online now finally buying that dang deer cart I should have bought 10 years ago!
    35 replies | 356 view(s)
  • Bob Peck's Avatar
    1 Week Ago
    Thanks Rich! Urban bowhunting is an art unto itself which I respect. I've been on a few of these hunts in Lynchburg, VA. Although I didn't shoot anything through my binos I was able to watch a rerun of Sanford and Son without sound of course on some guys TV next to the patch I was hunting. LOL! Maybe that's why I didn't see any deer. :wink
    35 replies | 356 view(s)
  • Bob Peck's Avatar
    1 Week Ago
    The spunk you speak of is really necessity. If there was any other way short of the deer cart I should have bought years ago trust me, I would have gladly taken any other option. I hope to one day hunt in Texas although avoiding said cactus patches you and DP mention. I've been to Texas on business fives times this year (Houston, Dallas 2X, San Antonio and Driftwood (just had to try the Salt Lick open pit barbecue.) Thank you sir! It's not so much I "deserve" anything. Over the years I have gained much more than I ever gave and I'm eternally grateful. It's the first time in a long time I listened and followed instructions instead of debating and arguing. The story was from the heart. Be well my friend and Merry Christmas!
    35 replies | 356 view(s)
  • Bob Peck's Avatar
    1 Week Ago
    That's some great work my friend! You my have my permission to stop for this season. :tu: You've done quite enough unless of course you donate the venison in which case you should keep on keepin on. Questions: Who took the pics? In picture #2 you have the face of a mass murderer. What were you thinking? 3rd buck/3rd pic Is that a box blind in the background? Did you shoot that one with the same Savage slug gun? When are you coming back to Virginia?
    24 replies | 556 view(s)
  • Bob Peck's Avatar
    1 Week Ago
    As a teenager my best friend’s Dad made his own deer cart out of old ladder stands drilled and bolted together. The axle came off a garden cart he had towed behind his lawn tractor. The wheels were bicycle tires complete with bicycle hand brakes that he rigged to be able to lock. Imagine a rickshaw for deer with a 4-point safety harness attached so you could be hands free at times. That contraption was ugly but effective in the Adirondacks where we used to hunt.
    35 replies | 356 view(s)
  • Bob Peck's Avatar
    1 Week Ago
    That's funny right there! :laugh: I text messaged my many friends (both of them) and got a "no can do". It was that exact moment that I knew I was screwed. Thank you sir. That day, that hunt, that deer was a pure blessing. The drag was not.
    35 replies | 356 view(s)
  • Bob Peck's Avatar
    1 Week Ago
    LOL!! Hardy har har! :laugh: I have one kid still in college, one in grad school with those expenses running parallel with a random series of Bank of Dad interest free loan requests married to the inevitable but unpredictable crisis (busted washer machine, tires for one of 5 cars I maintain) I would most surely love to have a 4-wheeler. But then ... oh wait ... I'd need a truck (any 'ol truck) to either tow it or put it in the bed ... oh wait ... that's right I can't use the 4-wheeler on Federal land or any of the "pick-a-spot" Google Earth hunts which around these Blue Ridge Mountains tend to be tectonic plates. As I said in my story it took years to find the opening to buy the Nikon binos and that only happened because my mother-in-law gave me a $50 Amazon gift card. Sooooo, my friend, the middle ground is springing for a deer cart before my heart blows up trying to get the next one out. On the plus side the first-responders can use the cart to get my fat a$$ out when I hit the EPIRB. I'll even strap myself in while I wait or just hunt with a note pinned to my jacket "I'm dead. Use the cart."
    35 replies | 356 view(s)
  • Bob Peck's Avatar
    1 Week Ago
    Thank you Chris. Many times. Found his bedding area and the general layout of his kingdom on the edge of a swamp but never, ever saw him again. Not a single picture. He just vanished. Funny you should mention a cart. I've been meaning to get a deer cart for years. On this particular hunt I seriously pushed myself waaay past the pain threshold. As I said, this drag helped me understand how hunters, especially old-out-of-shape hunters like me, have heart attacks.
    35 replies | 356 view(s)
  • Bob Peck's Avatar
    2 Weeks Ago
    Thanks Jon. Coming from you that means allot. I've never been a horn hunter even though the whole industry revolves around inches of bone or more to the point that moment we all dream of which is coming into close contact with many inches of bone. This was not a 30 yard bow shot. This was an antiseptic 180 yard unfair advantage I was all to happy to utilize. It's this story that's more important to me than the rack. Honest. There was a time a few years back when I came within 15 yards of a 170 class buck. I was wading knee deep in a briskly flowing South Anna River (more like a creek really) going one way trying to be all stealthy into a new area. When I stopped to listen and check GPS coordinates I still heard splashing. I remember thinking if it was a deer I stood ZERO chance with the bow in my hand. The thought never crossed my mind to nock an arrow. This buck was also in the creek navigating past me in the opposite direction and on the opposite bank. I hugged the muddy walls of the river bank which was at least 4-5 feet taller than me. I did my best impression of the root ball to the tree extending above me. At that point I couldn't see what was making the splashing sound and for all I knew it was a beaver or a raccoon. I did my best impression of a root ball trying to blend into the exposed roots of the tree towering above. Then he rounded the bend also in the water but 15 yards away on the opposite bank traveling in the opposite direction. If I'd had a firearm it would of been a no-brainer done deal. Such was the exact same thought on this last hunt. Neither buck ever saw me. The 170 in the South Anna River and I passed like two ships in the night. Wow, what an animal!
    35 replies | 356 view(s)
  • Bob Peck's Avatar
    2 Weeks Ago
    REMINDS YOU THAT YOU DON'T. I've hunted the same private land in Augusta County, VA for 12 years. A rural real estate friend of mine who helped my family find our first home in VA knew I was starting a new job at Parker Bows and this place was literally right down the street. My standing offer to the last two landowners has been "I'll keep the trespassers at bay, clear trails, keep access road clear and improve things like drainage to the pond and brush hogging if you'll let me hunt". Needless to say after 12 years I believe I know every square inch. What was once 120 acres is now down to 70 as parcels were sold and homesteaders moved in. Still ... I've been paid more in outdoor experiences, venison and contemplative relaxation than the hours behind a chainsaw or tractor. I can't tell you the number of products that have been tested on that property. I've used a combination of Plot Watchers, trail cams and surveillance to reasonably pattern the place. In year 2 or 3, I put an arrow through a respectable buck I had mounted but since that time I've only captured a few like it on trail cams and only an occasional glimpse through a chance encounter. The surrounding neighbors are all "brown is down" so over the years I've erased any hope of a shot opportunity on respectable buck #2 but still I hunt and hunt and hunt some more. My reward has been a bunch of venison to donate to help pay it forward. My last hunt started with a conversation with God. Not a prayer exactly but more like a nagging. I was beat. I have been hunting hard since our Oct 6th archery opener. Two (2) does down and no tracking required. Definitely no complaints. The mast crop was awesome but not a single pic of a buck, any buck, even a button buck off 12 cameras and two (2) plot watchers. This was not the norm and I braced. Back to this hunt last week. It was cold for Virginia. In the low 20's but no wind. It has turned to rifle season which is only 2 weeks so time is limited. I was comfortably warm buried deep within the covers. "If you don't get up and go now, you know and I know you won't go." Yep. I said to myself, he's right. Four snooze buttons later I was up. The usual internal debate and Q&A begins after that first cup of coffee. What's the wind direction? How much effort do you want to expend? Are you going to sit all day or just do a morning hunt? Maybe you'll split the difference and sit in the morning and still hunt till dark? 30-06? .308? .50 cal muzzleloader? .32 cal Model 94? Sheesh. Sometimes I set my own head spinning. The 30-06 my Dad gave me won. He's been ailing and I'm feeling this time next year he won't be with us anymore. The rifle is a reminder in my hands the hours he spent teaching me and rousting me from a comfortable sleep. Now ... which stand? "You need to go far today. All the way to the end of the property, follow the fence line down into the ravine halfway and hunt that stand you haven't been to since you checked it this summer." There was my answer but again it was a conversation with God. I can't explain how I know this. I just know. I asked the same 'ol questions of myself which are usually settled in my head on the way in, in the dark and usually fraught with ongoing debate even when I'm in the stand. This was different. I was told where to go and I went. I'm up at 3:30, on the road by 4:30, on scene by 5:30, geared up and in the stand at 6 a.m. with sunrise scheduled for 7:05. I've got the gear down to a science ... the Under Armour, the Merino wool and Arctic Shield were doing their job nicely. I was happy to be looking at life through the new Nikon Monarch 5's (10x42) I've wanted for years but just couldn't get close with 1 kid thru college and 2 kids still in college and surprise bills that come out of nowhere. Thanks to an Amazon gift card the path to these binos happened. At 7:30 I'm in my Monarch 5 world and loving the difference from the Bushnell's I've had around my neck for many years. "Life is good." I say to myself. The response I heard plain as day was "Yes it is. Yes it is." The beast below and on the other side of the ravine came into view and ranged at 180 yards. I'm a die-hard bowhunter and while I'm comfortable with firearms I'm not Mr. Optics. I've blown many a shot just racking in the focus to get a tighter view of the shot placement. It's taken years but I'm learning to spot a distinctive tree-scape with one eye with the other in the optic *while* I rack in the focus. I lost the beast in the scope and got on the binos. There? Is that him? What the?! It's a big fat 'ol doe. Did I not have enough coffee? Was I seeing bone through the scope that wasn't there through the binos? The doe casually browsed down the side of the ravine across from my stand divided by a swollen creek. For just a brief moment I heard the sound of water combined with the sensation of my heart beating through the layers of insulation. Not a stitch of wind, just a piercing silence. Almost a tinnitus piercing silence. Browsing, browsing, browsing without a care in the world. I relaxed and waited. I got back in the scope and panned the vicinity of the chubs. Rhythmic streams of hot breathe met the 20 degree air. Whoa. Wait. O.K He poked his head out from the brush and filled the field of view inside the scope. Whoa baby! Just when you think you know everything God reminds you that you don't. "This isn't going to be easy." but I knew God was not talking about the shot. 185 yards through the range finder wasn't exactly a chip shot but definitely a comfortable distance and clear line of fire. He was talking about the drag as if the deed was already done. Some kind of weird time/space thing. I braced the gun in a perfectly placed "Y" branch extending from the trunk. Got the breathing under control and waited for the broadside. There it is. I feel like I'm on camera for a hunting show but it's just me. When I watch those shows I usually whisper to the TV, Shoot! Shoot. Except in this reality there is No rush. No worries just a perfectly smooth trigger pull and a drop straight down. No tracking required. There. I listened to the Man, followed his instructions and for the first time in my 60 years I didn't argue. I just went with it. The beast was down at 7:40 a.m. and would not be out of the woods until 3 p.m. that afternoon. I later found out he dressed out at 206 lbs. I dragged him down one ravine, floated him across a thigh high deep creek, up and over a barbed wire fence, up and over several blown downs, briefly contemplated a straight shot up the other side of the ravine and decided to follow the creek. I reasoned the drag would be longer by at least 1/2 a mile but the logging road up from the bottom would be less of an incline. Rather than carry the weight of my pack and rifle I climbed to the top of the ravine's edge and dismounted there returning back down to the bottom with only my handgun and a drag rope. I'm not kidding when I say this ... several times I literally laid down on the forest floor and waited for my heart to recover. It became crystal clear how it was possible for my hunting brothers and sisters die of heart attacks. I wondered how long I could do this and I don't mean drag the deer. No. There was never any doubt I would get that beast out of there. I wondered at 60 if this was a silent sign my days were numbered. It was 3-4' at a pull for nearly 2 miles. I kept telling myself "You can do this." For once I had no commitments and no pressure. I dragged on for hours taking more and more breaks the closer I got. "This is what you wanted, right?" "This is the deer you said you'd never find on this property right?" "This is the deer you would never have seen if you had your way in that cozy bed and now you're whining about how hard this drag is?" “You’ve logged hundreds of hunts on this land, you say you know every square inch, you tell friends there are no surprises here but yet every 3-4’ you advance there he is. a surprise at the end of the drag rope. Are you finally a believer now? Huh?” I’m not making this stuff up. This is what I heard. Believers will know what I speak of. Non-believers will just call it intuition or call me crazy. I'm fine with whatever but I know what I know. I looked back at the beast. In fact, I couldn't stop looking back. I smiled broadly every time. I laid my head down in the leaves and took a nap. For how long I don’t know but I was certain anyone who might have seen me laying there would assume I was dead. I was fully alive and fully comfortable a mere 220 yards from the summit. I had a flashback to my days as a high school track star and one-time state mile record holder. Back in the day, waaaaay back in the day, I used to be able to summon a “kick” and that was definitely called for now. I pushed through it and renewed my grunt to the summit. Gotta embrace the suck. Hallelujah Sweet Jesus! I made it in more ways than one. Ironically, just the day before this hunt I said to the same friend who helped me secure access to the property that if I managed one day to kill the deer of a lifetime I’d give up hunting. I mean, what more was there to accomplish? He said, “No you won’t. You have grandchildren to teach and besides I know and he knows (pointing upward) you need to be out there.” He’s right. <a href="https://imgur.com/jFPSdmM"><img src="https://i.imgur.com/jFPSdmM.jpg" title="source: imgur.com" /></a> <a href="https://imgur.com/2G8YTPc"><img src="https://i.imgur.com/2G8YTPc.jpg" title="source: imgur.com" /></a>
    35 replies | 356 view(s)
  • Bob Peck's Avatar
    2 Weeks Ago
    NO IDEA HOW THIS POST DUPLICATED ITSELF! READ THE OTHER ONE (PLEASE).
    0 replies | 39 view(s)
  • Bob Peck's Avatar
    2 Weeks Ago
    Bob Peck replied to a thread The fungus among us in Podunk Corner
    Apparently it's edible and has medicinal purposes. It's also known as monkey head mushroom, bearded tooth mushroom, satyr's beard, bearded hedgehog mushroom, pom pom mushroom, or bearded tooth fungus. It might be medicinal but I think I'll stick to Advil and beer.:ach:
    6 replies | 72 view(s)
  • Bob Peck's Avatar
    2 Weeks Ago
    Bob Peck replied to a thread The fungus among us in Podunk Corner
    How about this one? It's called Lions Mane fungus. Through the binos from a distance it looked like some kind of furry softball sized creature that didn't move for several hours while on stand. It looks like it's be soft to the touch but it wasn't. Kinda rough and spiny feel. <a href="https://imgur.com/DBRD7fa"><img src="https://i.imgur.com/DBRD7fa.jpg" title="source: imgur.com" /></a>
    6 replies | 72 view(s)
  • Bob Peck's Avatar
    3 Weeks Ago
    Trying to think if I built one from absolute scratch using the best-of-the-best if the total tab would come to $50k https://www.yahoo.com/sports/hassan-whiteside-buys-50k-assault-rifle-immediately-stolen-leaving-unlocked-rolls-royce-020551481.html
    5 replies | 218 view(s)
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About Bob Peck

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Take no part in the unfruitful works of darkness, but instead expose them.

Ephesians 5:11

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